Vaccinations are life saving medicines designed to help protect animals from various serious and life threatening diseases.

Kitten vaccination course

First injection from 9 weeks of age, with a second injection 3 weeks later.  Your pet will then require an annual booster vaccination.

Diseases you may vaccinate for

Feline Panleucopenia
This disease can affect cats of all ages, with kittens particularly at risk. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhoea and dehydrations. The virus is passed on in the faeces and can persist for a long time in the environment. This disease is often fatal.

Cat Flu
Cat Flu is easily transmitted from other infected cats, and contaminated environments, such as cat bowls, etc. Several organisms are involved and regular vaccination is required tohelp keep them at bay. Signs of Cat Flu can be similar to a human cold – it can cause a runnyu nose and eyes, and a sore throat. Some cats can be very severely infected with symptoms including fever and mouth ulcers.

Chlamydia
This disease is spread by close contact between cats. Chlamydia can cause severe conjunctivitis which may be very umcomfortable and long-lasting. Fever can also occur, often resulting in a reluctance to eat.

Feline Leukaemia Virus
This viral disease can cause severe damage to the immune system and may also cause tumours. This virus is spread between cats by close contact, such as grooming, fighting and sharing food/water. There is no effective treatment, and the only way to ensure that your cat is not at risk from this virus is to ensure vaccinations remain up to date.

Rabies
Although the UK is rabies-free, cats travelling abroad are required by law to be vaccinated against rabies. If you are considering taking your cat abroad, let your vet know straight away. More information can be found on taking pets abroad on the DEFRA website.

What to expect following vaccination

The vaccine’s job is to stimulate the immune system. When the vaccine is administered to your cat its immune system will get to work .The work that the immune system is asked to do can cause a transient rise in body temperature. Sometimes, this can make cats feel lethargic. If this occurs, it will usually be shortly after vaccination and your pet will soon be back to their normal selves.

If you have any concerns or queries regarding this, please contact us on 01293 884422.

Puppy vaccination course

First injection from 6 weeks of age, with a second injection at 10 weeks (must be 2 weeks between first and second injection).  Your pet will then require an annual booster vaccination.

Diseases you may vaccinate for

Canine Distemper
This infection disease can cause variable symptoms including fever, coughing, discharge from the eyes and nose, vomiting and diarrhoea. This can also eventually lead to cracked foot pads and noses. Some dogs may suffer from neurological symptoms such as seizures. Moreover, distemper is often fatal.

Infectious Canine Hepatitis
This disease attacks the liver, kidneys and lungs. Signs often include coughing, vomiting, diarrhoea and pale gums. The disease is rapid and can cause death within 24-36 hours. Some dogs can recover and then shed the virus for many months, posing a threat to other dogs. Thanks to vaccination, this disease, like distemper, is relatively rare.

Canine Parvovirus
This virus is contagious and very persistent in the environment. Dogs of all ages can become infected but puppies are particularly susceptible. This disease often causes vomiting and diarrhoea which is generally blood. Infected dogs are also lethargic and refuse to eat or drink. Outbreaks still regularly occur. Canine Parvovirus is often fatal.

Leptospirosis
This is a condition which can be passed on from animals to humans. It is caused by bacteria which can be picked up from watercourses and urine of other infected animals. It targets the internal organs. Signs vary from flu-like symptoms to severe abdominal pain. Our vaccine protects against 4 types of the Leptospirosis disease, in contast to many traditional vaccines that protect against 2.

Kennel Cough (Canine Parainfluenza and Bordetella )
Parainfluenza is a component of kennel cough. This disease is caused by several infectious agents passed on through airborne droplets from ne dog to another. The main signs are a harsh hacking cough with gaggins and retching which resembles having something stuck in the throat. Your vet may recommend vaccinating for Bordetella too.

Rabies
Although the UK is rabies-free, canines travelling abroad are required by law to be vaccinated against rabies. If you are considering taking your pet abroad, let your vet know straight away. More information can be found on taking your pet abroad on the DEFRA website.

Will my dog need a second vaccination?
If this is the first vaccination your puppy has received, or if your dog’s booster vaccinations are out of date, your pet will require another appointment to get a second injection. This is to ensure a good level of immunity develops to protect against these harmful diseases.

What to expect following vaccination

Vaccination teachers your dog’s immune system to recognise and defend against potentially deadly and incurable diseaasees. Our practice has selected to use Versican as out dog vaccine because of its effectiveness and ability to protect against a broad spectrum of diseases. Following vaccination, your dog’s immune system generates a protective response to help keep it free from these dangerous disease.

As a result of the immune system being stimulated, just as we see with vaccines given to children, your puppy or dog may appear a little quiet, have a slightly raise temperature and perhaps be a bit off their food for 24 hours or so. It is common to find a lump where the vaccination was given, and whilst this may be a little uncomfortable when touched, it will soon disappear.

If you have any concerns beyond this, then please contact us on 01293 884422.